Zoom Ceropegia Woodii
Zoom Ceropegia Woodii
Zoom Ceropegia Woodii
Zoom Ceropegia Woodii

Ceropegia Woodii

$25.00

OVERVIEW

+Comes in a 6" plastic container with hanger. Strand length varies, see photos.
 
This evergreen succulent vine was discovered by John Medley Wood in 1881 hanging from rocks in South Africa. The Royal Botanic Gardens (KEW) named it after its discoverer in 1900, eg "Woodii." This is most definitely one of our shops top five favorite hanging plants, once established its long trails make for a perfect statement piece in any room. 
CLASSIFICATION  / GENUS:   
Gentianales / Ceropegia
COMMON NAMES:
String of hearts / Chain of hearts / Sweetheart vine / Hearts Entangled / Rosary Plant
PLANT SIZE: 
It's a trailing vine that can reach lengths of up to 13 feet. Its leaves are heart shaped and can be 1/2-1-inch-wide and long.
COLD HARDINESS: 
This plant can be hung outdoors year-round in zones 11 and 12. If temperatures are going to be below 50 degrees F, it is recommended to move this plant indoors. This plant is more commonly found indoors.
MAINTENANCE: 
Low Maintenance
LIGHT: 
Filtered light. When exposed to sufficient light quality the Ceropegia Woodii develops a deep green color, under insufficient light the leaves will be a pale green. If hung outdoors, this plant prefers partial shade, direct light on this plant can scorch the leaves. 
WATERING: 
This plant requires excellent drainage, and should be watered only when dry and never stand in water, or have too soaky of soil, which will lead to rot of the tubulars. It is often joked that the more you neglect to water this plant, the better off it will be. This plant is not a high humidity plant either, and most household temperatures are a perfectly suitable environment. You may mist them on occasion, particularly along the length of the vines. 
SOIL: 
Cactus or succulent mix is great for this plant. 
DOES IT FLOWER? 
Yes, small little whitish pink flowers. 
IS IT POISONOUS/TOXIC? 
Non-toxic.
CAN IT BE PROPAGATED FROM CUTTINGS? 
Yes. Along the vines the plant will produce small, bead-like tubers or bulbs, which give it its nickname "Rosary" vine. These bulbs can be planted like seeds to grow new plants quickly and easily. You can either add them to the parent plant to make for more vines, or put them into fresh pots to create new plants. 
POSSIBLE ISSUES: 
Repotting this one can be tricky, as each vine is made up of small bulbs. The best time to repot is when the plant seems root-bound, when this happens, repot the plant in the early spring / Too much water can lead to root rot which is very detrimental to the tiny strands / Common pests:  Mealy bugs and Aphids.  

WINTER TRAVEL: PLEASE MAKE SURE TO PURCHASE A HEAT-PACK (FOUND WITHIN OUR STORE) IF THE PLANT IS TRAVELING IN BELOW 50 DEGREE WEATHER.