Zoom Hoya Variegated Hindu Rope (6" pot)
Zoom Hoya Variegated Hindu Rope (6" pot)
Zoom Hoya Variegated Hindu Rope (6" pot)

Hoya Variegated Hindu Rope (6" pot)

$80.00

OVERVIEW

+ Comes in an 6" plastic container. No Hindu is alike, please see photos for options.


The Hindu rope is one unique plant. Originating from Southern India, this asexual plant is actually believed to be a cultivar plant of Hoya Carnosa, as one has never been discovered in a wild habitat. Both an epiphyte, air-plant, and a succulent, due to its leaves, this slow growing plant can make quite the statement in a home with its rope-like vines, that can reach up to six feet in length. 
CLASSIFICATION  / GENUS:   
Apocynacea (milkweed plant) / Hoya
COMMON NAMES:
Hindu Rope / Krinkle Kurl / Indian Rope / Angel Rope / Hoya Carnosa Compacta
PLANT SIZE: 
It's a trailing vine that can reach lengths of up to 6 feet.
COLD HARDINESS: 
This plant can be hung outdoors year-round in zones 11 and 12. If temperatures are going to be below 50 degrees F, it is recommended to move this plant indoors. This plant is more commonly found indoors.
MAINTENANCE: 
Low Maintenance 
LIGHT: 
Bright light, but not direct light. Southern exposure is best, but they do well in east or west locations as well in front of a window. They can live in very low light rooms, but they will probably never bloom in these conditions. 
WATERING: 
Like most Hoya plants, these are succulents and require very little water. Water when the soil is almost dry. During the winter, even less.The most important thing to remember with any Hoya, is that they are mostly epiphytic, so they dont like standing water or soggy soil. While a plastic liner is perfectly fine to house a Hoya, some people who are worried about over watering, will prefer to place these into a terra-cotta pot, which can help wick away excess water. Misting is also recommended along the ropes. 
SOIL: 
Cactus or succulent mix is great for this plant.  Since the Hindu rope has a tiny root system that branches off its main lines, it tends to like very well aerated, and fast draining potting soil (you can add sand to your mix if the soil is seeming heavy). This hoya also likes to be root bound, and prefers to stay in their pot for long periods of time, even indefinitely; this can cause the soil to become compacted and aeration methods (e.g. poking holes in the soil) is recommended over time.  Fertilize during the summer months. 
DOES IT FLOWER? 
Yes, small little whitish pink flowers. Be forewarned the Hindu rope can take many years to blossom, and is considered one of the slower Hoyas to show its blossoms. It requires almost near perfect conditions, which are the right amount of bright light, food and water. When they do blossom, it will be in late spring or early summer. It is often a common mistake for people to remove the little peduncles (or spurs) that are along the vine, which are where the flowers blossom (and will continue to blossom for years to come), removing these can hinder the plant from further blossoming.
IS IT POISONOUS/TOXIC? 
All Hoyas are considered toxic (as they produce sap similar to the milkweed), but not necessarily poisonous, the amount of ingestion varies from animal, but on a whole the ASPCA regards them as safe to have around pets and children. 
CAN IT BE PROPAGATED FROM CUTTINGS? 
Yes. These can be propagated anytime using stem tip cuttings. Either via water propagation or direct to soil with rooting powder. Be forewarned the leaves on the cutting will get wrinkly until established and then they should plumb up again (this can take up to 3 weeks).
POSSIBLE ISSUES: 
Repotting this one can be tricky, particularly with older Hindus and is often not advised. The vines that hold the crinkled leaves can snap off very easily when they get older, and it’s often recommended to just leave a Hindu as-is in its pot, they quite prefer to be root bound. / Common Pests: While Aphids and spider mites can be common pests for a Hindu, they are rare, the most common pest and almost guaranteed pest on a rope are Mealy bugs. The Hindu ropes have perfect hiding places for these pests, and its advised to inspect the Hindu’s on a weekly basis during watering. If you see any mealy, simply kill them with a cotton swab and alcohol. / Common Diseases: Botrytis, which is a fungus that can cause the leaves to turn grey and result in root rot, this is mainly caused by overwatering. If Botrytis is suspected, repotting in fresh soil is advised, cutting off any of the decay.


WINTER TRAVEL: PLEASE MAKE SURE TO PURCHASE A HEAT-PACK (FOUND WITHIN OUR STORE) IF THE PLANT IS TRAVELING IN BELOW 50 DEGREE WEATHER.